Friday, November 18, 2005

SoNG 005 Every Womon Here

This song's stories emerged from a women's writing workshop and a child visiting Seneca during the summer of 1985. I played music with the Average Dyke Band, a spontaneous group that arose around the campfires in that summer.    ~ Myke


Every Womon Here
Written by Myke Johnson, Average Dyke Band*, 1985

I hear you crying in angry words,
Why is it normal that each of us has a story
of rape and violence, rape and violence?
Each of us, every womon here.

I want to live without fear in my life
I’m so past ready for joy
I’ll hold your pain in the well of my own
I’ll hold your hand on the long walk home
Every womon here

Only a child tell she understood

just what a nuclear war would mean
Tell me stories that say it’s not true
Lying will do
None of us can return to where we were before

I want you to live without fear in your life
You’re so past ready for joy
I’ll hold your pain in the well of my own
I’ll hold your hand on the long walk home
Every woman here

We want to live without fear in our lives
We’re so past ready for joy
I’ll hold your pain in the well of my own
I’ll hold your hand on the long walk home
Every womon here 


     * The Average Dyke Band (ADB) sprang up at the camp in the summer of 1985. The theory we put into action was that songs, singing and musical instrumentation were not the domain of an exclusive, talented few. We had found that far too many women fell silent musically because somewhere along the way they were told they didn't have a good voice, couldn't carry a tune, couldn't keep a beat. The ADB, then, was the musical counterpart to the Camp's consensus process philosophy and practice - every woman's voice would be heard. We were inclusive, we were average, and we had a damn good time.

Remember when you first heard this song? Remember times you sang it or heard it sung? Share your memories with the rest of us by commenting on this here post!


2 comments:

Anonymous said...

I remember so often singing this song with the sisters. as we sat there singing i would look around knowing that so many of us had our own stories of rape and violence, and often wondered if this is what brought us back to the camp over and over again.

Amber said...

This as most of the songs was my favourite. I recall so often sitting around a campfire or in the barn or out working or whatever singing this song. I would look around into the beautiful faces of our sisters and see the pain in their eyes, the tears running down their cheeks as they sang this song.
It was then I knew I was not alone.